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Archives September 2018

TCS Wins Frost & Sullivan’s Award for 2018 Asia-Pacific BPM Solutions Provider of the Year

TCS Wins Frost & Sullivan’s Award for 2018 Asia-Pacific BPM Solutions Provider of the Year

SINGAPORE, 26 September 2018Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), a leading IT service, consulting and business solutions organisation, has won Frost & Sullivan’s 2018 Asia-Pacific ICT Award for BPM Solutions Provider of the Year.

The Frost & Sullivan award recognises companies demonstrating outstanding achievement and superior performance in areas such as leadership, technological innovation, customer centricity, and strategic product development in their business segments, and their efforts to improve the industry as a whole.

VP and Head of Cognitive Business Operations (CBO) at TCS, Ashok Pai said:

“It’s a great honour to be named the Asia-Pacific BPM Solutions Provider of the Year 2018 by Frost & Sullivan,” said Ashok Pai, VP and Head, Cognitive Business Operations (CBO), TCS. “This recognition is a testament of our Business 4.0™ vision and strategy encompassing contextual knowledge, design thinking, and innovation and highlights our success in the region.”

TCS’ CBO unit engages with forward-thinking customers across the world with leading-edge, technology-led solutions that reimagine business operations end to end, including the underlying IT systems and supporting infrastructure, and drive superior business outcomes. These solutions leverage AI, machine learning, IoT, cloud, analytics, computer vision, and RPA, while adopting Agile practices across Business Process Services, IT Infrastructure Services, and IT Operations.

Head of Customer Contact Research Digital Transformation Practice for the Asia Pacific at Frost & Sullivan, Krishna Baidya said:

“TCS has been strengthening its capability and aligning well to strategically partner with businesses aspiring to be successful next-generation digital enterprises. Business 4.0™, TCS’ thought leadership framework combining technology, contextual knowledge, and deep domain expertise, bodes well with customers across geographies and sectors. TCS’ expanding global network delivery footprint, language capability, proven analytical skills, technology transformation competences, and excellent customer-centric approach continue to deliver business outcomes for its clients. Leveraging its Machine First Delivery Model (MFDM™), the provider won many marquees and transformational deals in the region. A sharply focused and holistic approach to the digital opportunity has gained significant market share for the company in FY18.”

TCS won the award for the fifth consecutive year. The strong overall performance and back-to-back award win exemplify TCS’ leadership in cognitive business operations and business process services in the region.

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New CEO of X-mini, Hoong He Hin

X-mini reshuffles its C-suite with new CEO and COO

Former Group Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Onwards Media Group, Hoong He Hin has been unveiled as the new CEO of the award-winning local audio brand, X-mini.

Announced today at the media event where X-mini showcased its latest audio products, He Hin will take over the position from the co-founder and former CEO, Ryan Lee, who will now serve as the brand’s Chief Technology Officer (CTO).

The new CEO of X-mini is no stranger in the technology sector. With more than 15 years of experience in the industry, he brings with him a wealth of knowledge in business development, which will prove vital to leading X-mini to new heights.

He Hin said:

“X-mini became a success story for Singapore consumer technology and innovation when it launched its groundbreaking capsule speaker in 2007. We look forward to taking X-mini to new heights by expanding into new product categories, as well as providing more digital content to our customers in the future. We also plan to double total staff strength from 20 to 40 to build our engineering, product management and sales and marketing teams, in order to meet market demand for new product offerings.”

The reshuffling also saw another new face, Keith Wong, who will take on the role of Chief Operations Officer (COO) to manage X-mini’s day-to-day operations and drive product sales. Keith shared that the appointment of He Hin will see X-mini expand into a new direction and the new role for Ryan will help drive product innovation.

He said:

“His (He Hin) experience in opening distribution channels worldwide, streamlining production processes and securing strong collaborations with large organisations will see a positive step in our growth. Not only will he lead the brand as we look at expanding into the digital content arena, but his appointment will also allow Ryan to focus on what he does best – product innovation.”

The new changes to the management could mean a new era for X-mini as they plan to explore the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in its future products.

The company had recently secured its second series of funding of S$5 million from private individuals and corporate investors.

X-mini shared that the “latest round of funds will see the audio brand expand its product range into earbuds for the first time, as well as move beyond hardware and into the digital arena.”

Without giving much away, Ryan said:

“AI and the Internet of Things (IoT) provide a treasure trove of opportunities for the brand, as we continue to innovate by leveraging on our expertise in audio engineering and delivering great sound to consumers moving forward.”


Shavonne Wong

Shooting her way to the top in the world of photography

Five months into her job scooping ice-cream, Shavonne Wong decided to trade-in the scoop for a camera. A decision that went on to win her numerous recognitions and awards for her fashion photography.

Her excellent photography skills also caught the eye of the producers for the reality television show, Asia’s Next Top Model, where Shavonne was invited to be the guest photographer last season, and for Season 6 this year.

In this interview, we check in with Shavonne to find out her story behind her successful career in photography and what she thinks makes a good photographer.

Shavonne Wong

What made you fall in love with photography?

I have always been a creative since young. Used to study 3D animation in school and as much as I loved it, it took months to come up with a 15s clip. Photography was a lot more instantaneous, plus I got to play a bigger role on how I wanted the end result to look. It also gave me the opportunity to work with amazing talents to create some beautiful work.

What was the most significant break of your photography career?

Getting to shoot for Asia’s Next Top Model gave me the biggest boost in exposure, credibility and industry validation.

What were the challenges you encountered starting up?

Like most freelancers, especially creative ones, the money was very inconsistent. It was quite difficult financially and made it hard to appreciate any non-monetary achievements.

Were your loved ones supportive of your decision to become a photographer?

I have been very blessed in that aspect! I’m sure my parents were worried in the beginning, but they were still very supportive. It was important especially during the months when the income wasn’t great, and I knew I still had a bed to sleep in and food in the fridge.

What do you think makes a good photographer and a good photo?

Someone who loves to create and does it out of passion. Honestly, gear has improved so much over the years. To stand out, you need to have good ideas and intention behind what you shoot.

You’ve done so much photography work but if you have to choose, what’s that one photo that you would call it your best work?

Shavonne Wong's favourite photo

I chose this image not because I think it’s my best work but because of how it came about. I was setting up my lighting and sunlight was shining through the windows. I considered closing the windows so it would not affect the lighting too much but was a little too lazy so I wanted to see how it’ll look. And ta-dah! I guess in a way I was experimenting… through laziness.

Gears! What are your must-have gears when you go for shoots?

Honestly, I’m not a technical person. I have a 6-year-old camera (5Dmk2) and just three basic lenses (35mm, 50mm, 85mm). They’re also all second hand.

Do you lug all your gears when you travel for leisure? If not, what do you bring along for your travel photos?

I don’t usually lug my gear around for travel photos, but when I do travel even on holidays, I do try to plan photoshoots while I’m there so, in a sense, I bring my gear. But not for the usual travel photos.

You’ve travelled around the world to do shoots. What’s your absolute favourite place to shoot and why?

I loved shooting in NYC. There’s just so many fantastic talents to work with and locations to shoot. The air just oozes with creativity. Plus they also have beautiful natural light.

You are the guest photographer for Asia’s Next Top Model 2018. How’s the experience like?

Shavonne Wong on AsNTM set

Amazing. It was amazing the first time they got me to shoot for them last season but for them getting me again this year and flying me over to Bangkok to shoot was a real validation. It’s fun, working with the girls and people like Cindy Bishop and Yu Tsai. Also interesting to see me actually on TV.

You have achieved so much over the years. What’s next for you?

I hope to get into videography. The world is changing, and technology is just getting more and more advanced. I feel like as long as I am not too stuck in my old ways and continuously experimenting and having fun, it should be good.

What’s your advice for aspiring photographers?

Be yourself, don’t be a second-grade version of anybody else. And find yourself a mentor or be an assistant. You’ll learn faster.


Amalina Naser - co-founder of PINDEMIC

Pinning her passion onto the world map

Thirty-one-year-old Amalina Naser is the co-founder of PINDEMIC, which specialises in making customised lapel pins. Started its operations in 2015, PINDEMIC has turned lapel pins into a fashion statement, giving those who pin them on a subtle amplification of their real identity. Each lapel pin is original and the quality is impeccable.

PINDEMIC Lapel Pins

In her interview with entrée, Amalina shares how she got PINDEMIC started and the challenges she faced in building a brand that reaches customers worldwide, and more.

“…creatives are very stubborn people.”

What were you doing before starting PINDEMIC?

Three years ago, I was in my first year studying Communication Design offered by The Glasgow School of Art Singapore when I started PINDEMIC. It was an outlet for excess creative thoughts and a great way to apply what I have learnt in school. Before that, I was working as a designer and it was during the break in my career to further my studies which afforded me an opportunity to start something as fun as PINDEMIC.

Can you share with us what is PINDEMIC and how did the idea come about?

I remember my penchant for collecting badges and lapel pins or patterned collar pins whenever I am travelling overseas and when I was engaging in activities in the Book Club in primary school. Perhaps this childhood interest has planted the seed of starting PINDEMIC.

PINDEMIC is the alternative voice. It is the rebel in all of us. It was born of restless minds and an insatiable need to accessorise. There were many ideas and that popped into our heads that needed to take physical form. We decided to work with a product that is very versatile – lapel pins.

What were the reactions from your loved ones when you told them that you are starting your business?

They are quite supportive now and they even help out when they can.

What were the initial challenges you faced and how did you overcome them?

There isn’t a market for pins in Singapore. The pin culture is really strong overseas especially in the States but just not in Singapore. It went beyond making what we like to educate the market.

Have you ever thought of giving up?

No, creatives are very stubborn people.

How long does it take for you, on average, to make a pin and which pin took you the longest?

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The design process, like all creative processes, is not a fixed one. There are many things that influence and inspire us and we draw from a collective memory bank. The idea for a pin design can come from something as simple as a word that resonates with us or from a drawn-out brain-storming session where we attempt to formulate and capture our thoughts on a little 30mm space. While we are inspired by love and life and certainly pop culture, not all designs translate well into pins and we have had to abandon a few ideas that we were excited about. Once we are satisfied with the final artwork, we send it into production which takes about 2-3 weeks.

What’s your favourite pin and why?

PINDEMIC

My favourite pin is the statement pin that declares The Future is Female because I feel that if the tide should change, there is no better moment than the present.

What’s your advice to aspiring artistpreneurs?

Persevere. Young people who are talented in the field of design should have a positive spirit in creating new ideas and works of art that can be used by the community. Do not be easily discouraged by people’s criticisms.


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